Five Steps To Survive A Plane Crash


The odds of dying on a commercial airline flight are actually as low as 9 million to 1. That said, a lot can go wrong at 33,000 feet (10,058.4 m) above the ground, and if you’re unlucky enough to be aboard when something does, the decisions you make could mean the difference between life and death. Almost 95% of airplane crashes have survivors, so even if the worst does happen, your odds aren’t as bad as you might think. You can learn to prepare for each flight safety, stay calm during the crash itself, and survive the aftermath.
But we don’t wish for such situation, do we?

Incase, here are 5 steps to take to survive a Plane crash

1. WEAR COMFORTABLE CLOTHES AND SHOES

You’ll need to be able to stay warm if you survive a crash. Even if that is not a consideration, the more of your body is covered during impact, the less likely you are to receive serious injuries or burns. Wear long pants, a long-sleeve t-shirt, and sturdy, comfortable, lace-up shoes

  • Loose or elaborate clothing poses a risk, as it can get snagged on obstacles in the close confines of a plane. If you know you’re going to be flying over cold areas, dress appropriately, and consider keeping a jacket on your lap.
  • Cotton or wool clothing is also preferable as it is less flammable. Wool is preferable to cotton when flying over water, as wool does not lose its insulating properties to the degree cotton does when wet.

2. SIT ON THE TAIL OF THE AIRCRAFT

Passengers in the tail of the aircraft have 40% higher survival rates than those in the first few rows, in the event of a crash. Because a quick escape gives you the best chance for survival, it’s best to get seats as close as possible to an exit, on the aisle, and in the back of the plane.

  • Yes, it’s actually statistically safer to fly economy than first-class. Save money and stay safer.

3. COUNT THE NUMBER OF SEATS BETWEEN YOUR SEAT AND THE EXIT DOOR


Find the exit closest to you, and count the number of seats that it’ll take to get to it. If the plane crashes, it could be smoky, loud, or confusing in the cabin afterward. If you need to escape, you might have to feel your way to the exit, which will be a lot easier if you know where it is and how far.

  • You might even write down the number in pen on your hand, so you’ll have a quick reference if you need to.

4. BRACE FOR IMPACT

Try to determine what surface the plane will land on so you can customize your preparations. If you’re going to be landing in water, for example, you’ll want to put your life vest on, though you need to wait to inflate it until you’re out of the plane. If you’re going to be landing in cold weather, you should try to get a blanket or jacket to keep you warm once outside.
If you know you’re going to crash, return your seat back to its full upright position and stow away any loose items that could become hazardous, if at all possible. Zip up your jacket and make sure your shoes are tied tightly to your feet. Then assume one of two standard brace positions used for surviving a plane crash and try to remain calm.

5. GET OUT OF THE PLANE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE

According to the National Transportation Safety Board, 68 percent of plane crash deaths are due to post-crash fire, not injuries sustained in the crash itself. It’s critical to get out of the aircraft without delay. If fire or smoke is present, you will generally have less than two minutes to safely exit the plane.

  • Make sure the exit you choose is safe. Look through the window to determine if there is fire or some other hazard outside of an exit. If there is, try the exit across the plane, or proceed to another set of exits.

And remember Read the safety card and listen to the pre-flight safety speech.

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